Polls: 58% surveyed unhappy with ‘stricter gun legislation;’ only 4% feel gun control is ‘an important problem;’ only 47% are ‘angry’ that new gun laws failed to pass; police oppose gun control

May 3, 2013, 9:21 pm
  


 



We’ve gathered some poll numbers that anti-Second Amendment politicians should take into account before national elections in 2014, so tell your reps. Of Americans surveyed: 1) “58 percent of people worry that stricter gun legislation would make it more difficult for people to protect their families;” 2) only 4% consider gun control the “most important problem facing this country today;” and, 3) only 47% “say they are ‘angry’ or ‘disappointed’ that gun legislation failed to pass.” Regarding a very important subset of U.S. citizenry, “15,000 verified law enforcement professionals” taking part in a recent gun control survey “oppose the theories brought forth by gun-control advocates” and “feel that those [gun] controls will negatively affect their ability to fight violent criminals.”

First, from Pew via ABC:

… 48 percent of gun owners purchased firearms for protection — an increase of 22 percent from the survey conducted in August of 1999. 65 percent of women listed protection as their top priority, compared to 43 percent in 1999, while 42 percent of men said protection was their main concern, up 21 points from 1999. …

58 percent of people worry that stricter gun legislation would make it more difficult for people to protect their families and homes

Second, from Gallup via CNS:

Only 4 percent of Americans think guns and gun control are an important problem facing the country, according to Gallup, and far more Americans are concerned about the economy, unemployment and the federal debt.

As Gallup reports, “Few Americans mention guns or immigration as the most important problems facing the nation today, despite the current attention lawmakers in Washington are giving to these issues. The economy still dominates as the top concern, followed by jobs and dissatisfaction with the general way in which Congress and the government work.” …

Thirdly, from the Washington Post/Pew via the Atlantic Wire:

After senators filibustered a gun background checks bill, President Obama gave an angry speech, promising that “we can still bring about meaningful changes that reduce gun violence so long as the American people don’t give up on it.” But according to a new Washington Post/Pew Research Center poll, the American people are kind of over it. Less than a majority — 47 percent — say they are “angry” or “disappointed” that gun legislation failed to pass after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Conn. That is a lot less than the frequently-cited 90 percent who supported the substance of the bill, universal background checks. A large minority, 39 percent, say they’re “relieved” or “happy” that the bill did not advance. …

Note that no “filibuster” took place. All gun control measures brought before the Senate recently were defeated with majority votes.

Finally, let’s look at a poll conducted by PoliceOne, via al.com, in which “15,000 verified law enforcement professionals took part.” Note that “70 percent of respondents are field-level law enforcers — those who are face-to-face in the fight against violent crime on a daily basis — not office-bound, non-sworn administrators or perpetually-campaigning elected officials.” The bottom line is that these brave souls polled don’t support gun control. Here are the specifics:

1.) Virtually all respondents (95 percent) say that a federal ban on manufacture and sale of ammunition magazines that hold more than 10 rounds would not reduce violent crime. …

2.) The majority of respondents — 71 percent — say a federal ban on the manufacture and sale of some semi-automatics would have no effect on reducing violent crime. However, more than 20 percent say any ban would actually have a negative effect on reducing violent crime. Just over 7 percent took the opposite stance, saying they believe a ban would have a moderate to significant effect. …

3.) About 85 percent of officers say the passage of the White House’s currently proposed legislation would have a zero or negative effect on their safety, with just over 10 percent saying it would have a moderate or significantly positive effect. …

4.) Seventy percent of respondents say they have a favorable or very favorable opinion of some law enforcement leaders’ public statements that they would not enforce more restrictive gun laws in their jurisdictions. Similarly, more than 61 percent said they would refuse to enforce such laws if they themselves were Chief or Sheriff. …

5.) More than 28 percent of officers say having more permissive concealed carry policies for civilians would help most in preventing large scale shootings in public, followed by more aggressive institutionalization for mentally ill persons (about 19 percent) and more armed guards/paid security personnel (about 15 percent). …

6.) The overwhelming majority (almost 90 percent) of officers believe that casualties would be decreased if armed citizens were present at the onset of an active-shooter incident. …

7.) More than 80 percent of respondents support arming school teachers and administrators who willingly volunteer to train with firearms and carry one in the course of the job. …

8.) More than four in five respondents (81 percent) say that gun-buyback programs are ineffective in reducing gun violence. …

9.) More than half of respondents feel that increased punishment for obviously illegal gun sales could have a positive impact on reducing gun violence. …

10.) When asked whether citizens should be required to complete a safety training class before being allowed to buy a gun, about 43 percent of officers say it should not be required. About 42 percent say it should be required for all weapons, with the remainder favoring training classes for certain weapons. …

11.) While some officers say gun violence in the United States stems from violent movies and video games (14 percent), early release and short sentencing for violent offenders (14 percent) and poor identification/treatments of mentally-ill individuals (10 percent), the majority (38 percent) blame a decline in parenting and family values. …

Share this info with your elected reps and tell them to support the Second Amendment



Related: Constitution, Elections, Guns, Public Opinion


Leave a Reply

By posting a comment, you agree to our Terms of Service and Usage.