Archive for the 'Regime Change' Category

A Terror Leader Behind Bars in Egypt

Wednesday, August 21st, 2013

by Raymond Ibrahim*

The supreme leader of the Muslim Brotherhood, the head of the Islamist snake, Muhammad Badie—who had slipped security forces by traveling in and out of the Brotherhood torture camps (known as “peaceful sits ins” by the mainstream media”)—has finally been arrested in Egypt and is awaiting trial. Not only was he the leader of the Brotherhood, but, according to Brotherhood members themselves, he was giving orders to his underling, Muhammad Morsi, the now ousted Egyptian president.

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Israel’s Bad Neighborhood

Saturday, August 10th, 2013

by Ambassador (ret.) Yoram Ettinger, “Second Thought: a US-Israel Initiative,” “Israel Hayom”

While the Middle East combusts, threatening vital US interests, the US attempts to clip the wings of Israel — the only reliable, predictable, stable, effective, democratic and unabashedly pro-US firefighter in the region.

Western policy-makers and public opinion molders welcomed the 2011 riots on the Arab Street as an Arab Spring, a people’s revolution and a transition toward democracy. However, Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Yemen and Syria have demonstrated that the Arab Street is experiencing an Arab Tsunami and a transition towards intensified chaos, totally unrelated to the Palestinian issue, which has been a regional sideshow. In fact, Alexei Pushkov, Chairman of the International Committee in Russia’s Duma, stated on July 4, 2013: “the ongoing events in Egypt confirm that the so-called Arab Spring has led not to democratic renewal but to chaos… We can see this in Egypt, in Libya, in Syria, and in Iraq… The events in Egypt show that there can’t be a quick and gentle transition from an authoritarian regime to political democracy. There can’t be such a transition in the Arab Middle East countries…”

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Obama, McCain and Graham make a ‘huge mistake’ in Egypt

Friday, August 9th, 2013

by Raymond Stock*

On their current trip to Cairo, Senators John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), two of President Barack Obama’s most persistent critics on everything in foreign policy from Syria to Benghazi, have found common cause with him at last.

All three fear that the anti-American (and generally anti-human) Muslim Brotherhood (MB), whom they mistakenly see as “moderate,” will disappear from the halls of power in Egypt, our most important Arab ally. They also evidently worry that the MB’s leading figures, such as now-deposed (and arrested) President Mohamed Morsi—who had awarded himself powers greater than any previous ruler in Egypt’s history—will not be free to plot a return to power in an ancient nation that he had nearly destroyed in only one year.

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What to Want in Egypt

Tuesday, July 30th, 2013

by Daniel Pipes*

In the aftermath of the coup d’état in Egypt, a consensus has emerged, to cite an anonymous Obama administration official, that “Trying to break the neck of the [Muslim] Brotherhood is not going to be good for Egypt or for the region.”

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Egypt after Morsi: Joy and Worry

Thursday, July 4th, 2013

by Daniel Pipes*

The overthrow of Mohamed Morsi in Egypt delights and worries me.

Delight is easy to explain. What appears to have been the largest political demonstration in history uprooted the arrogant Islamists of Egypt who ruled with near-total disregard for anything other than consolidating their own power. Islamism, the drive to apply a medieval Islamic law and the only vibrant radical utopian movement in the world today, experienced an unprecedented repudiation. Egyptians showed an inspiring spirit.

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What Turkey’s Riots Mean

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

by Daniel Pipes*

Rebellion has shaken Turkey since May 31: Is it comparable to the Arab upheavals that overthrew four rulers since 2011, to Iran’s Green Movement of 2009 that led to an apparent reformer being elected president last week, or perhaps to Occupy Wall Street, which had negligible consequences?

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The Good News in Turkey

Thursday, June 6th, 2013

by Daniel Pipes*

How to interpret the recent unrest on the streets of Istanbul and about 65 other Turkish cities? Specifically, is it comparable to the Arab uprisings over the last 2½ years in Tunisia, Libya, Egypt, Syria, Yemen and Bahrain?

On one level, they appear unrelated, for Turkey is a far more advanced country, with a democratic culture and a modern economy. But two connections — autocracy and Syria — do tie them together, suggesting that the Turkish demonstrations could have a potentially deep importance.

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Time for regime change in Iran

Wednesday, November 21st, 2012

By Saeed Ghasseminejad and Sara Akrami

Iran’s nuclear problem remains unresolved, and seems to be irresolvable, as the Islamic regime is desperate for a nuclear bomb. Iran has not shown any interest in the offers made by the international community. However, there is a road not yet been taken, and that is investing in the Iranian people, who have experienced two major revolutions over the past 100 years.

Three years ago, the Iranian people showed that they were ready to take to the streets and protest against Ali Khamenei, Iran’s supreme leader. In order to stop an apocalyptic, fundamentalist regime from acquiring a nuclear bomb, democratic states of the world need to change their policies toward the Iranian government.

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